Fans of the Eighteenth Century
Mar
31
to Apr 28

Fans of the Eighteenth Century

From the De Young Museum

Fans have served as accessories of fashion and utility since antiquity but reached their peak production and use in eighteenth-century Europe. Made from and embellished by precious materials such as ivory, mother-of-pearl, and silver and gold leaf, eighteenth-century fans also featured designs that reflected the spirit of their times. Fans addressed current events as well as themes of broad interest, including biblical and mythological tales and romanticized domestic and pastoral vignettes. Fans of the Eighteenth Century explores this quintessential period of fan production through a selection of examples from the permanent collection.

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Beyond the Suit: Contemporary Menswear from the Collection of Alexandre Marr and Dominic Iudiciani
Jul
27
to Jun 30

Beyond the Suit: Contemporary Menswear from the Collection of Alexandre Marr and Dominic Iudiciani

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From the Kent State University Museum

This exhibition explores current trends in menswear design by focusing on the personal collection of Alexandre Marr and Dominic Iudiciani. Marr and Iudiciani’s unique taste shaped the selection of these individual pieces which reveal breaks in men’s fashion from the previously ubiquitous tailored suit. Rather than jackets, trousers and button-down shirts, the garments and ensembles displayed here feature alternatives to more conventionally structured and tailored pieces. These garments also call into question the traditional binary between menswear and women’s wear. While women have been wearing trousers for decades, skirts have remained an exclusively feminine garment. Designers’ runway collections are increasingly pushing the envelope and offering variations of skirts for men. Various designers have pushed silhouettes beyond the square shouldered, trim-waisted shape of the traditional suit. The exhibition features work by such notable labels as Rick Owens, Gareth Pugh, Julius_7, Dior Homme, Comme des Garçons, and Issey Miyake.

The move away from the traditional suit has also moved out of the clearly defined levels of formality for clothing. The basic gray or navy suit is appropriate for the work place or dressy occasion such as a party or even a wedding. Tuxedos or even white ties and tails represent even more formal wear. However, society is moving away from these strictly defined codified clothing options. The punk or goth aspect to the designs of Rick Owens and Gareth Pugh stands as a rejection of the formality of society and the workplace.

All of the pieces in the exhibition are black which allows for a concentrated focus on details of cut, construction, proportion, and materials. In moving away from traditional silhouettes, many of these designers rethought the relationship between the clothing and the underlying shape of the body. Many pieces have unusual proportions with high waists, widened shoulders and exaggeratedly long sleeves that distort the normal silhouette of the human form. Unusual materials ranging from thermoplastics to pleated polyester further serve to transform how the garments fit and move.

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Ornamental Traditions: Jewelry from Bukhara
Sep
1
to May 13

Ornamental Traditions: Jewelry from Bukhara

From the Art Institute Chicago

Located in present-day Uzbekistan, the Emirate of Bukhara (1785–1920) was an important center of Islamic religion and scholarship and a major oasis on the famous Silk Road that traversed Central Asia from ancient times. As such, it was highly diverse—home to the majority Uzbek and Tajik populations in addition to communities of Arabs, Jews, and Turkmens who played a role in the emirate’s vibrant trade. Over time, Bukhara developed its own iconic style of jewelry characterized by intricate blue enamelwork that mirrored the area’s blue-glazed, tiled architecture. Russia’s colonization of the region in 1866 brought with it more advanced enameling techniques, allowing for increasingly complex designs.

In almost every context, the jewelry of Bukhara embodied great meaning and was rarely considered mere decoration. Incredibly large, ornate suits of jewelry were thought to protect the wearer from evil spirits, particularly during important events like weddings, and were the strongest assertion of a person’s power and wealth. Throughout Uzbekistan, such objects were designed to be worn as sets rather than exist as singular pieces.

Some of the most magnificent examples of Uzbek jewelry come from the court of the last emir of Bukhara, Mohammed Alim Khan (1880–1944), where men and women dressed in embroidered silks, fine silver, and enameled jewels. Their jewelry served various functions, often simultaneously: indicating political status and wealth, signifying religious and spiritual practice, and marking important rites of passage or ethnic identity.

Ornamental Traditions: Jewelry from Bukhara brings together nearly 50 jeweled objects from the Central Asian region of Bukhara—promised gifts from the private collection of Barbara Levy Kipper and her late husband, David—and rare ikat and embroidered textiles from the Art Institute’s permanent collection. The jewelry and decorative objects presented in this exhibition offer an exceptional experience of a rich and vibrant artistic heritage rarely seen outside the former Soviet Union.

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Fashion Meet the Body
Sep
28
to Sep 1

Fashion Meet the Body

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From the Kent State University Museum

FASHION MEETS THE BODY is a Juried KSU Faculty Exhibition that will be exhibited in the KSU Museum September 28, 2018 - September 1, 2019. All juried work selected by our two jurors, Rachel Delphia and Margaret Powell from Carnegie Museum of Art relates to the to the theme “Fashion meets the body.” Both individual and collaborative faculty work from The Fashion School and the School of Art including innovative two- and three-dimensional artwork using technology, mixed media, and fiber will be showcased in the exhibition.  

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Fabulous Fashion: From Dior’s New Look to Now
Oct
16
to Mar 3

Fabulous Fashion: From Dior’s New Look to Now

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From the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Experience the drama and glamour of some of the most creative feminine fashions ever designed, from romantic ball gowns to audacious contemporary ensembles, and everything in between. See how designers have used color and pattern, shape and volume, draping, metallics, and embellishments to continually reinvent the art form. The pieces in the exhibition—daywear, bridal wear, and more—showcase the Museum’s outstanding costume collection. Many are on view for the first time.

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Capturing the Catwalk: Runway Photography from the Michael Arnaud Archive
Oct
27
to Aug 31

Capturing the Catwalk: Runway Photography from the Michael Arnaud Archive

From the FIDM Museum

Capturing the Catwalk is the first exhibition to explore the pioneering photography of Michel Arnaud, whose work for Harper’s Bazaar and British Vogue spans the 1970s–1990s. Featuring garments and accessories from brands such as Christian Dior, Chanel, and Gianni Versace alongside selections from the unparalleled photographic archive donated by Arnaud, Capturing the Catwalk highlights the synergy of fashion journalists and trendsetters, couture and ready-to-wear clientele, and runway spectacle in the age of supermodels.

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Jewelry: The Body Transformed
Nov
12
to Feb 24

Jewelry: The Body Transformed

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From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

What is jewelry? Why do we wear it? What meanings does it carry? Traversing time and space, this exhibition explores how jewelry acts upon and activates the body it adorns. This global conversation about one of the most personal and universal of art forms brings together some 230 objects drawn almost exclusively from The Met collection. A dazzling array of headdresses and ear ornaments, brooches and belts, necklaces and rings will be shown along with sculptures, paintings, prints, and photographs that will enrich and amplify the many stories of transformation that jewelry tells.

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Georgia O'Keefe: Living Modern
Nov
23
to Mar 3

Georgia O'Keefe: Living Modern

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From the Cleveland Museum of Art

Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern offers a unique look into the fascinating connections between the paintings, personal style, and public persona of one of America’s most iconic artists. Throughout her 70-year career, O’Keeffe defied convention and forged a fiercely independent identity that was integral to her art. Showcasing several of her paintings alongside her garments—many shown here for the first time—and photographic portraits of her as a subject, the exhibition reveals O’Keeffe’s determination to be strikingly modern not only in her art but in her life.  

The exhibition is organized in sections that run the gamut from her early years—when she crafted a signature style of clothing that dispensed with ornamentation—to her blossoming career in New York during the 1920s and 1930s—when a black-and-white palette dominated much of her art and dress—and to her mature years in New Mexico, where her art and clothing changed in response to the surrounding colors of the American Southwest. The final section explores the significant role photography played in establishing O’Keeffe’s celebrity, when younger generations of artists visited her, solidifying her status as a pioneer of modernism and as a contemporary style icon.

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Sara Berman's Closet
Dec
4
to Mar 10

Sara Berman's Closet

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From the Skirball Cultural Center

Take a look inside Sara Berman’s Closet—an installation by artists Maira Kalman (b. 1949) and Alex Kalman (b. 1985) based on the life of Maira’s mother and Alex’s grandmother, Sara Berman (1920–2004). 

At the age of sixty, Berman relocated to New York from Tel Aviv after ending a thirty-eight-year marriage. One morning, in another self-expressive burst of independence, Berman decided to wear only white. With militaristic precision and loving care, Berman kept her minimal belongings in perfect order, starching, ironing, folding, and stacking her clothes—even her socks—within a humble closet in her small studio apartment in Greenwich Village. Berman’s closet and its monochromatic contents became emblematic of her liberation: she had left behind her upper‐middle-class life and its possessions to have a room and a style of her own. 

When Berman died, in 2004, her family saved the contents of her closet. Ten years later, Maira and Alex recreated the closet in an alleyway in lower Manhattan for Mmuseumm. In 2016, Sara Berman’s Closet was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. At the Skirball, the installation will be complemented by twelve new paintings by Maira that depict pivotal scenes from her mother’s life—from childhood to marriage to finding freedom in New York. Don’t miss the LA engagement of this intimate exploration of identity, feminism, family, and memory. 

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Fabric in Fashion
Dec
4
to May 4

Fabric in Fashion

From the Museum at FIT

Fabric In Fashion explores the role played by textiles in forming the silhouette in Western fashion over the last 250 years. The examination of textiles is often separated from that of the fashionable silhouette, yet historically, textiles were as important as the cut of clothing in keeping up with current fashion. This exhibition delves into the mechanics of textiles, looking at how fibers and weaves build the materiality of fashion. It will also explore the cultural influence of fabric. The Western world’s demand for fashionable textiles of silk, cotton, wool, and synthetics has had enormous repercussions across the globe.

Fabric In Fashion highlights both clothing and flat textiles from the museum’s permanent collection, examining how the physical properties of specific fabrics determine the way a piece of clothing interacts with the body, as well as how the design and cultural associations of textiles reveal the social motivations that drive fashion forward. The exhibition is organized by Elizabeth Way, assistant curator of costume.

Read more about Fabric in Fashion

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Women Empowered: Fashions from the Frontline
Dec
6
to Mar 31

Women Empowered: Fashions from the Frontline

From Cornell University

From activists to politicians, artists, designers, athletes, scientists, organizers, mothers, and everyday unsung heroes, Women Empowered is curated according to the physical and public spaces where women’s bodies have carried messages of empowerment.

“Fashion has far too often been misunderstood and misrepresented as superficial. The garments and accessories in this exhibition show the very opposite: fashion is a highly visible and forceful medium that commands attention and communicates possibilities,” says Denise Green, assistant professor of Fiber Science and Apparel Design and Director of the Cornell Costume & Textile Collection. “Feminism and fashion have the potential to go hand in hand, and the pieces in this exhibition prove just that.”

An opening reception will take place from 5-7 pm on Thursday, December 6, 2018, in the College of Human Ecology Commons.

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Once Upon a Tapestry: Woven Tales of Helen and Dido
Dec
7
to May 27

Once Upon a Tapestry: Woven Tales of Helen and Dido

From the Norton Simon Museum

Once Upon a Tapestry: Woven Tales of Helen and Dido presents a selection of artworks that explore the fates of two heroines from classical mythology whose stories have inspired poets, artists and musicians over the centuries: Helen of Troy and Dido of Carthage. Five tapestries from the 16th and 17th centuries, along with a rare set of cartoons, illustrate the currency of these female-centric narratives in early modern Europe, the power of tapestry to visualize such stories and the inventiveness and skill employed to produce these splendid objects, made for the wealthiest and most distinguished patrons.

Homer’s epic poem of the Trojan War, the Iliad, written in the eighth century BCE, is the source for the dramatic story of Helen of Troy. Medieval poets updated the ancient tale and often added commentary to connect European nobles to their heroic Trojan counterparts. In the visual arts, these contemporized versions of the Iliad challenged artists to depict the conflict of battle, and the large-scale, multipaneled character of tapestry provided a magnificent vehicle for their ambitions. It is all the more notable then that Helen, an icon of beauty whose abduction from Sparta and her king provoked the Trojan War, figures so prominently in four of the tapestries exhibited. They chronicle Helen’s fate, from her arrival in Troy and marriage to Paris to her return to Sparta and her reconciliation with her first husband, Menelaus. Her leading role in these panels may be a stage for exploring the then-topical power of female beauty. Rich with detail, these luxurious silk and wool tableaux introduce us to contemporary court attire and to medieval stagecraft, as seen in the jewel-encrusted architectural framework that calls attention to the principal subjects.

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Majesty and Mystery: Saving a Napoleonic Court Gown
Feb
5
to Apr 12

Majesty and Mystery: Saving a Napoleonic Court Gown

From the FIDM Museum

After a distinguished military career and surprising coup d’état, Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821) was crowned Emperor of France in Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, on December 2, 1804. Beside him at the coronation was his wife Marie-Joseph-Rose de Tascher de la Pagerie de Beauharnais (1763-1814), whom he called "Joséphine." Emperor Napoléon’s reign lasted until 1815; together, he and Empress Josephine ushered in a remarkable new era of artistic expression. A strict dress code was mandated at royal court functions and the Empress was the ultimate arbiter of style. For formal occasions, ladies wore fashionable high-waist gowns and trains made from yards of French-produced silk satin, lace, velvet, and net with precious metal embroidery motifs that symbolized the rulers: bees, roses, and tulips, as seen in the florals here. The astonishingly rare Napoleonic court ensemble at the focus of this intimate exhibition was worn by a high-ranking member of the imperial circle – possibly even the Empress herself.

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Diamond in a Rhinestone World: The Costumes of Dolly Parton
Feb
5
to Mar 17

Diamond in a Rhinestone World: The Costumes of Dolly Parton

From the Grammy Museum

Eight-time GRAMMY® winner, Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and Oscar-nominated artist Dolly Parton has been widely renowned as not just a music legend, but a fashion icon. To showcase iconic costumes and pieces from her personal archive, the GRAMMY Museum®proudly presents Diamond In A Rhinestone World: The Costumes Of Dolly Parton presented by City National Bank, which will be the first exhibit Parton has had in the United States outside of her Tennessee theme park Dollywood. The exhibit will open on Feb. 4, when Parton will discuss stories and the history behind these costumes at the Museum’s Clive Davis Theater as part of an exclusive Town Hall Program. The exhibit opens to the public on Feb. 5 and will run through March 17.

Diamond In A Rhinestone World: The Costumes Of Dolly Parton will offer a retrospective of Parton’s career and most iconic fashion moments. The exhibit will also feature WHIM canvasses now at the Museum, making the GRAMMY Museum the first museum to showcase WHIM’s unique ability to see music differently and experience more.

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Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution / Terence Conran – Mary Quant
Feb
8
to Jun 2

Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution / Terence Conran – Mary Quant

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From the Fashion & Textile Museum

Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution will present the fashion, design and art of the Chelsea Set; a group of radical young architects, designers, photographers and artists who were redefining the concept of youth and challenging the established order in 1950s London. At the forefront of this group of young revolutionaries were Mary Quant and Terence Conran.

Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution will span the period from 1952 – 1977 and will present fashion, textiles, furniture, lighting, homewares, ceramics and ephemera in an exhibition that explores not only the style but the socioeconomic importance of this transformative period of time. Key pieces include rare and early examples of designs by Conran and Quant, plus the avant-garde artists, designers and intellectuals who worked alongside them, such as designers Bernard and Laura Ashley, sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi and artist and photographer Nigel Henderson.

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Jeffrey Gibson
Feb
13
to Jun 9

Jeffrey Gibson

From The New Museum

Jeffrey Gibson’s materials and production methods are hybrid and diverse; he often combines digital prints, found textiles, embroidery, hand-sewn fringe, and beadwork in vibrant assemblage-based paintings, sculptures, and garments. During his residency, Gibson will explore the material histories and futures of several traditional Indigenous craft techniques, including Southeastern river cane basket weaving, Algonquian birch bark biting, and porcupine quillwork, as practiced by many tribes across this land long before European settlers arrived. The artist notes that Indigenous crafts and designs have “historically been used to signify identity, tell stories, describe place, and mark cultural specificity,” explaining, “I engage materials and techniques as strategies to describe a contemporary narrative that addresses the past in order to place oneself in the present and to begin new potential trajectories for the future.” Employing techniques learned over the course of the residency, Gibson will produce a new series of garments that will be activated through performances and staged photo shoots in the Fifth Floor Gallery.

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Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture
Feb
21
to Jun 2

Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture

From The Frick Collection

Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture will be the first major exhibition in the United States to focus on the portraiture of Giovanni Battista Moroni (1520/24–1579/80). A painter of portraits and religious subjects, Moroni is celebrated as an essential figure in the northern Italian tradition of naturalistic painting that includes Leonardo da Vinci, the Carracci, and Caravaggio. This exhibition, to be shown exclusively at The Frick Collection, brings to light the innovation of the artist, whose role in a larger history of European portraiture has yet to be fully explored. His famous Tailor (National Gallery, London), for example, anticipates by decades the “narrative” portraits of Rembrandt, and his Pace Rivola Spini (Accademia Carrara, Bergamo), arguably the first independent full-length portrait of a standing woman produced in Italy, prefigures the many women that Van Dyck would paint in this format in the following century. 

The Frick will present about twenty of the artist’s most arresting portraits together with a selection of complementary objects — jewelry, textiles, armor, and other luxury items — that evoke the material world of the artist and his sitters and reveal his inventiveness in translating it into paint. Assembled from international private and public collections such as the National Gallery (London), the Accademia Carrara (Bergamo), and the Kunsthistorisches Museum (Vienna), the paintings and objects will bring to life a Renaissance society at the crossroads of the Venetian Republic and Spanish-ruled Milan.

Building on recent exhibitions in London (2014) and Bergamo (2004), and on a small but significant Moroni exhibition in Fort Worth (2000), Moroni: The Riches of Renaissance Portraiture is the most extensive scholarly assessment of Moroni’s portraits held outside of Italy to date. The fully illustrated catalogue will be the most substantial text on the artist’s portraits in English. The exhibition is organized by the Frick’s Associate Curator Aimee Ng with Simone Facchinetti (Curator, Museo Adriano Bernareggi, Bergamo) and Arturo Galansino (Director, Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, Florence) and will be accompanied by rich educational programming.

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Thierry Mugler: Couturissime
Mar
2
to Sep 8

Thierry Mugler: Couturissime

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From the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

The exhibition trace the path of an exceptional creator who revolutionized fashion with morphological and futuristic cuts, and glamorous, sculptural and elegant silhouettes; strict lines and super-heroine shoulders; and a corseted waist dressing a sublime, sensual and powerful woman in constant metamorphosis. The exhibition offers a dive into his singular imagination, to encounter by turns his perfectionism, Hollywood-style prestige, dreams, exotic creatures, eroticism, and science fiction. It will explain his audacious choices, such as using innovative materials in high fashion such as metal, fake fur, vinyl and latex.

Thierry Mugler has staged some of the most spectacular fashion shows of his time. He created the costumes for the staging of Shakespeare’s Macbeth by the Comédie Française and the Festival d’Avignon, and the Zumanity show by the Cirque du Soleil. He has dressed a galaxy of stars, such as Diana Ross, David Bowie, Lady Gaga, Liza Minnelli and, in Quebec, Diane Dufresne and Céline Dion. He has also created costumes for Mylène Farmer and Beyoncé for their tours and videos.

As a photographer and film-maker, he created the emblematic 1990s clip Too Funky by British singer George Michael, as well as short films starring actresses Isabelle Huppert and Juliette Binoche. Over the course of his career, Thierry Mugler has had many collaborations with filmmakers, architects such as Andrée Putman for his boutiques, and renowned photographers and artists, such as Helmut Newton, Dominique Issermann, Guy Bourdin, Herb Ritts, Peter Lindbergh, David Lachapelle and Pierre & Gilles.

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From the Traphagen School: Fostering American Fashion
Mar
5
to Mar 30

From the Traphagen School: Fostering American Fashion

From the Museum at FIT

The Traphagen School: Fostering American Fashion explores the legacy of one of the first institutions dedicated to educating fashion industry professionals in New York City. The impact of the school, in operation from 1923-1991, will be explored through an introduction to founder Ethel Traphagen, the main philosophies of the school, and its lasting influence. Highlights include ensembles by Geoffrey Beene and Anne Klein, evening wear by Luis Estevez and James Galanos, and illustrations by Antonio Lopez.

This exhibition, the first dedicated to the school, will focus on the Traphagen methods of design-by-adaptation and experimentation, both of which are still used in design education and the fashion industry today. The Traphagen School also includes never-before seen garments from the school’s study collection, as well as photographs, publications, and advertisements that chronicle the creative environment that Ethel Traphagen created for her students.

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Camp: Notes on Fashion
May
9
to Sep 8

Camp: Notes on Fashion

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From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Costume Institute's spring 2019 exhibition will explore the origins of the camp aesthetic, and how it has evolved from a place of marginality to become an important influence on mainstream culture. Susan Sontag's 1964 essay Notes on "Camp" provides the framework for the exhibition, which will examine how fashion designers have used their métier as a vehicle to engage with camp in a myriad of compelling, humorous, and sometimes incongruous ways.

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Minimalism/Maximalism: Fashion Extremes
Jun
1
to Feb 1

Minimalism/Maximalism: Fashion Extremes

From the Museum at FIT

Fashion is a world of extremes, where sartorial expression ranges from minimalist to maximalist aesthetics. Some designers may identify almost exclusively with one over the other; Calvin Klein, for instance, was known for fashion minimalism. However, the cyclical nature of fashion moves us through design periods alternately dominated by a minimalist or maximalist aesthetic, re-affirming Isaac Newton’s third law of motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

In fashion, minimalism and maximalism define two extremes along the design spectrum. Minimalism, the aesthetic of less-is-more, is based on a reductive approach to design, and celebrates purity and restraint. Maximalism, on the other hand, accentuates the beauty of excess and redundancy. While these may be considered aesthetic opposites, both seek to challenge perception, and as forms of expression, they serve as indicators of the sociocultural and economic zeitgeist of the given time period. Minimalism/Maximalism: Fashion Extremes explores the interplay between minimalist and maximalist aesthetics as they have been and continue to be expressed through fashion. Beginning in the eighteenth century, the exhibition examines how these aesthetic viewpoints are expressed over time and move fashion forward.

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Virgil Abloh: "Figures of Speech"
Jun
10
to Sep 22

Virgil Abloh: "Figures of Speech"

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From the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Virgil Abloh: "Figures of Speech" is the first museum exhibition devoted to the work of multihyphenate artist Virgil Abloh (American, b. 1980), best known for Off-White, the first luxury fashion brand designed and owned by an African American. Abloh’s work celebrates the ethos of street fashion, which appropriates—and occasionally corrupts—high culture, serving it up as something fresh and new. Justifying this time-honored method of subversion and intentional disruption, he has said: “Duchamp is my lawyer.”

Abloh got his start working for Kanye West’s creative team, having connected with the then-emerging rapper in 2002 while pursuing a master’s degree in architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Adopting West's deeply collaborative process for his own creative ventures, Abloh has since connected visual artists, musicians, graphic designers, fashion designers, and architects to craft an all-encompassing artistic universe.

The exhibition offers an in-depth look at the Chicago-based artist’s ever-expanding discipline, which encompasses fashion, architecture, music, and design. His signature fashion is presented in mannequin displays alongside video documentation of his most iconic shows. The exhibition also features the artist’s work in other mediums, including furniture design, graphic design work, architectural interventions, and collaborative projects with other designers and artists such as Peter Saville and Tom Sachs. At the core of Abloh’s work is a deep interest in empowering young people, and this will be central to the exhibition, with a full program of youth-oriented programming and cross-disciplinary offerings that mirror the artist’s wide range of interests.

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Paris: Capital of Fashion
Sep
6
to Jan 4

Paris: Capital of Fashion

From the Museum at FIT

Paris, Capital of Fashion will explore how and why Paris became the international capital of fashion. It will feature approximately 75 fashion ensembles, dating from the 18th century to the present, as well as accessories. Curated by Dr. Valerie Steele, director of The Museum at FIT, this major exhibition will be accompanied by a book and symposium.

The introductory gallery will place Paris within the global fashion system. After the Second World War, Paris was repeatedly challenged by new fashion centers, such as London, Milan, and New York. The first section of the main gallery will focus on the rise of the Paris fashion system in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The court at Versailles was the official epicenter of fashion, but fashion professionals were based in the city of Paris and foreign visitors were amazed by the Parisian “mania” for fashion. The second section will explore the growth of the Paris fashion system with its many métiers de la mode and its increased focus on feminine fashion. Particular attention will be paid to the development of the haute couture, which transformed dressmaking from a small-scale artisanal craft into big business and high art. Today, globalization and technology have transformed the world of fashion. Yet Paris remains a unique fashion city.

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Power Mode
Dec
10
to May 9

Power Mode

From the Museum at FIT

Power is part identity, part behavior, and part physicality. The way we outfit ourselves can play an outsized role in conveying power to others - whether it be the pink “pussy hats” at the 2017 Women’s March or the Cleveland Cavaliers’ coordinated Thom Browne suits during the 2018 NBA playoffs. However, power is not easily defined. It is political position and economic status, but also military strength, sexual authority, rebellion, and protest. Each form of power has found sartorial expression in a variety of ways, from gray flannel suits to latex fetish wear, and from gilded brocades to distressed jeans.

Power Mode will explore the role fashion plays in establishing, reinforcing, and challenging power dynamics within society. It will include both men’s and women’s clothing from the 18th century to the present, organized thematically to concentrate on five categories: military, suits, status, rebellion, and sex. Each section will investigate how certain designs and garments have come to be culturally associated with power, as well as how their meanings have evolved over time. The exhibition will also examine how fashion designers have interpreted these stylistic
archetypes — both to convey and to subvert power.

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Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse
Feb
7
to Apr 19

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse

From the Museum at FIT

Ballet is a century’s old art form that consistently reflected and absorbed prevailing fashions. It was not until the interwar years of the twentieth century that ballet took its place in the western pantheon of modern high culture and began to influence many areas of creativity, including fashion. At the same time, the ballerina, the art form’s most celebrated practitioner, blossomed into a revered figure of beauty and glamour, and her signature costume — the corseted tutu — inspired many of fashion’s leading designers for the first time. Organized by Patricia Mears, deputy director of MFIT, Ballerina: Fashion’s Modern Muse will illustrate the rise and subsequent influence of classical ballet and ballerinas on high fashion from the early 1930s to the late 1970s. The popularization of classical ballet during the mid-century owes much to the British and Americans. A French creation that was elevated to a supreme art form in Imperial Russian, classical ballet would become the most popular performing art in the United Kingdom during the 1930s and 1940s, and later, the United States. At its peak, from the early 1930s to mid-century, haute couture looked to classical ballets such as Giselle, Swan Lake, and Sleeping Beauty for aesthetic inspiration. Modern ballets performed in leotards and tights would also influence mid-century American activewear fashions.

Most of the 80 objects on view in the exhibition will be high fashion garments, ranging from Parisian couture to British custom-made clothing to American ready-to-wear. Also included will be a small selection of costumes and rehearsal clothing illustrating the rich yet often overlooked connection between classical ballet and fashion. The exhibition will be accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book to be published by Vendome Press. Contributors will include Patricia Mears, Laura Jacobs, Joel Lobenthal, Jane Pritchard, and Rosemary Harden.

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Fashion Police: Using Anthropology to Navigate Fashion's Cultural Politics
Feb
6
6:30 PM18:30

Fashion Police: Using Anthropology to Navigate Fashion's Cultural Politics

“Please join us for a lecture from Fashion Anthropologist Mikaila Brown. Dr. Brown’s doctorate is in Anthropology and Education from Columbia University. A lecturer at Cornell University, she is also the founder and CEO of The Common Thread Project, which highlights cultural diversities within the fashion industry by investigating the style trends of local communities.”

Co-Sponsors: Fashion Studies, MALS at the Graduate Center, The Fabric of Cultures Project, and the CUNY Center for Fashion Studies

Wednesday, February 6th 6:30pm
Com. Lit Lounge Room 4116

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Grey Area: Authenticity, Value, and Subversion in Fashion
Jan
12
to Feb 2

Grey Area: Authenticity, Value, and Subversion in Fashion

NYU Steinhardt’s Costume Studies MA Program presents Gray Area: Authenticity, Value, and Subversion in Fashion, an exhibition of eight case studies that explore authenticity in fashion, on view at 80WSE Gallery from January 12 – February 2, 2019.

The exhibition examines more than a century of complex shifts in the production, consumption, and perceived worth of objects deemed valuable for reasons beyond the cost of their materials. From the smuggling of coveted nineteenth-century French goods to the current feedback loop of brand-endorsed label appropriation exemplified by designers such as Marc Jacobs, Gray Area illuminates the process by which value in the fashion system is assigned, maintained—and subverted. In so doing, this exhibition shines a light on the levels of ambiguity and gray areas in which the objects on display reside.

“Fashion itself is a gray area of sorts, with a labyrinthine history surrounding authorship, labor, and manufacture,” said Huber. “Through these individual case studies the exhibition embraces and challenges many of the inherent contradictions that fashion embodies: as a major global industry, important site of creative production, and broader social mechanism.”

Opening Reception

The opening reception for Gray Area: Authenticity, Value, and Subversion in Fashion will be held on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at 80WSE Gallery in the Project Space at 80 Washington Square East, between West 4th Street and Washington Place from 5:00 – 7:00 PM. The reception is free and open to the public.

Symposium

The exhibition symposium will take place on Saturday, February 2, 2019 from 12:00 – 2:00 PM at the NYU Einstein Auditorium at 34 Stuyvesant Street. The co-curators will each present a paper on their exhibition research and will be joined by keynote speaker (to be announced). The event is free and open to the public.

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Fantasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic
Nov
1
to Jan 31

Fantasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic

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From the Museum of Popular Culture

From The Wizard of Oz and The Princess Bride to Harry PotterFantasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic invites audiences on a fantastical journey to unearth the inspiration behind this genre’s most magnificent creations.

Pet a dragon designed by Seattle Opera and explore hands-on installations that include world building and mapmaking. See the Wicked Witch of the West’s hat from The Wizard of Oz, weaponry from The Lord of the Rings, the battle headdress and staff used by the White Witch in The Chronicles of Narnia, and other iconic costumes and props from TV and the silver screen.

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