Exhibition: "Making Mainbocher: Main Rousseau Bocher"
Oct
22
Aug 20

Exhibition: "Making Mainbocher: Main Rousseau Bocher"

  • Chicago History Museum

From the Chicago History Museum:

The Chicago History Museum explores the life and legacy of an enterprising Chicagoan who rose to the heights of the fashion world in its newest costume exhibition, “Making Mainbocher: The First American Couturier,” opening Saturday, October 22.

The exhibition features nearly 30 garments from the Museum’s permanent collection. Enhanced by fashion illustrations, photography, oral histories and video, the ensembles reveal the story of a remarkable man and his journey to become the first American working as a couturier in Paris.

“By examining the steps taken by Main Bocher to achieve great success as a couturier, this exhibition introduces visitors to the extraordinary career of Main Bocher and invites them to get know him as an arbiter of early- to mid-twentieth-century style,” said Petra Slinkard, curator of costume, “This exhibition is the first of its kind, dedicated to the study and presentation of the work of Mainbocher.” 

Image courtesy the Chicago History Museum.

Exhibition: "Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty"
Nov
4
Apr 2

Exhibition: "Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty"

  • Brooklyn Museum

From the Brooklyn Museum

Marilyn Minter’s sensual paintings, photographs, and videos vividly explore complex and contradictory emotions around beauty and the feminine body in American culture. She trains a critical eye on the power of desire, questioning the fashion industry’s commercialization of sex and the body. Marilyn Minter: Pretty/Dirty is the first retrospective of her work.

Spanning more than four decades, the exhibition begins with the artist’s earliest artworks, from 1969 through 1986, including rarely exhibited photographs as well as paintings incorporating photorealist and Pop art techniques. It continues with works from the late 1980s and 1990s that examine visual pleasure in visceral depictions of food and sex. The exhibition culminates in Minter’s ongoing investigation of how the beauty industry expertly creates and manipulates desire through images.

Image: Marilyn Minter (American, born 1948). Rouge Baiser, 1994. Courtesy Brooklyn Museum.

Exhibition: "Hubert de Givenchy – To Audrey with Love"
Nov
26
Mar 26

Exhibition: "Hubert de Givenchy – To Audrey with Love"

  • Gemeentemuseum Den Haag

From Gemeentemuseum Den Haag:

French couturier Hubert de Givenchy is one of the leading fashion designers of the 20th century. His career ran concurrent to that of Christian Dior and Cristóbal Balenciaga and he is a living legend in the history of haute couture. The Gemeentemuseum is delighted and extremely honoured to be able to create this prestigious exhibition hand in hand with Monsieur De Givenchy himself. The exhibition will not only be a grand retrospective. Monsieur De Givenchy also pays homage to his muse, Audrey Hepburn. 

Hubert de Givenchy – To Audrey with Love will give a unique insight into Hubert de Givenchy’s career, which spanned a period of half a century, from the opening of his fashion house in 1952 through his retirement from it in 1995. The couturier has personally selected many of his favourite creations, some of which have never previously been on show to public.

Image courtesy Gemeentemuseum Den Haag.

Exhibition: “Tenue correcte exigée, quand le vêtement fait scandale”
Dec
1
Apr 23

Exhibition: “Tenue correcte exigée, quand le vêtement fait scandale”

  • Musée des Arts décoratifs

From Musée des Arts décoratifs:

Featuring more than 400 garments and accessories, portraits, caricatures and objects, this original and unexpected exhibition explores the liberties taken with dress codes and how they breached moral values. The robe volante, women in trousers, men in skirts, female tuxedo, miniskirt, baggy, jeans… All challenged vestimentary norms and were savagely criticised, even banned when they first appeared. Because they were too short or too long, too close or too loose fitting, too immodest or too covering, too feminine for men or too masculine for women, they transgressed the established order. The exhibition explores three major themes: Dress Codes, Girl or Boy? and Provocative Excess in an exhibition design by Constance Guisset.

Image: Walter Von Beirendonck, ready-to-wear autumn/winter 1996-1997, © Guy Marineau.

Exhibition: "Black Fashion Designers"
Dec
6
May 16

Exhibition: "Black Fashion Designers"

  • Fashion & Textile History Gallery at FIT

From The Museum at FIT

Black Fashion Designers examines the significant, but often unrecognized, impact that designers of African descent have had on fashion. The exhibition features approximately 75 fashions by more than 60 designers. Although there have been exhibitions on individual black designers, this is the first major exhibition in many years that highlights the global history of black fashion designers from the 1950s to the present. All of the objects on display are part of the permanent collection of The Museum at FIT.

Black Fashion Designers is organized by Ariele Elia, assistant curator of Costume and Textiles, and Elizabeth Way, curatorial assistant, at The Museum at FIT. The curators were supported by an advisory committee of scholars and fashion professionals, some of whom are participating in the exhibition’s symposium, audio tour, and Fashion Culture program series.

Black Fashion Designers Symposium and Educational Initiatives

The Museum at FIT will host a one-day symposium on February 6, 2017, featuring talks by designers, models, journalists, and scholars on African diasporic culture and fashion. A provisional list of speakers for the symposium and Spring 2017 Fashion Culture program series includes writer Teri Agins, stylist June Ambrose, journalist and photographer Dario Calmese, Professor Alphonso McClendon, designers Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs of Cushnie et Ochs, Dapper Dan of Harlem, designer Grace Wales Bonner, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Robin Givhan, former model and founder of The Diversity Coalition Bethann Hardison, Professor Monica Miller, designer Mimi Plange, Professor Eric Darnell Pritchard, Professor Elena Romero, Professor Victoria Rovine, costume designer Jeriana San Juan, and model Veronica Webb.

Image courtesy The Museum at FIT.

Exhibition: "Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the YU Museum Collection"
Dec
7
Apr 29

Exhibition: "Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the YU Museum Collection"

  • The Yeshiva University Museum

From the Yeshiva University Museum

Our ancestors used clothing and textiles to beautify their synagogues, their tables and themselves on Shabbat and holidays as well as important lifecycle events. Many of these were preserved and worn or used by several generations. More recently, Jews purchased special clothing and textiles to both to support Israel’s economy and to show their support for Israel by wearing or displaying them in their homes.

Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a nineteenth century Ottoman velvet bridal dress, an Adele Simpson evening dress trimmed with fox fur, a 1753 Ashkenazic wimpel, and an early 19th century Alsatian Passover Seder show towel.

Image courtesy the Yeshiva University Museum.

Exhibition: Museum of Transology
Jan
20
Apr 22

Exhibition: Museum of Transology

  • London College of Fashion

From Fashion Space Gallery:

The Museum of Transology is the largest and boldest display of trans artefacts and photographic portraiture ever displayed in the UK. This highly intimate exhibition will challenge the idea that gender is fixed, binary and biologically determined by exploring how the artefacts helped fashion self-shaped gender identities.

The display will feature photography by Bharat Sikka and Sharon KilgannonMy Genderationfilms by Fox Fisher and Lewis Hancox, Sexing the Transman and Mr Angel documentaries by adult film star Buck Angel, behind the scenes footage from Born Risky by Grayson Perry.

Collected and curated by E-J Scott, and made possible by those who donated their stories and personal objects.

Image courtesy Fashion Space Gallery.

Exhibition: "Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968"
Feb
10
Apr 15

Exhibition: "Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968"

  • Museum at FIT

From the Museum at FIT:

Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 highlights one of the most groundbreaking time periods in fashion history. While many books and exhibitions about this era position London as the center of innovative, youth-oriented design, this limited perspective overlooks the significant role that Paris continued to play in the fashion industry. Paris Refashioned, 1957-1968 examines the combined influence of French haute couture, ready-to-wear, and popular culture during this era, with particular emphasis on how fashion was perceived and promoted by the American fashion press. All objects on view were selected from The Museum at FIT’s permanent collection of more than 50,000 objects.

Photo: Pierre Cardin "Cosmos" dress, 1967, courtesy Museum at FIT.

Exhibition: "Native Fashion Now"
Feb
17
Sep 4

Exhibition: "Native Fashion Now"

  • The National Museum of the American Indian–New York

From the National Museum of the American Indian

From vibrant street clothing to exquisite haute couture, Native Fashion Nowcelebrates the visual range, creative expression, and political nuance of Native American fashion. Nearly 70 works spanning the last 50 years explore the vitality of Native fashion designers and artists from pioneering Native style-makers to maverick designers making their mark in today's world of fashion.

Featuring contemporary garments, accessories, and footwear spanning a variety of genres and materials, this exhibition features designers who traverse cross-cultural boundaries between creative expression and cultural borrowing. From one of Patricia Michaels' (Taos Pueblo) finale ensembles from the reality television series Project Runway to Jamie Okuma's (Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock) dramatically beaded Christian Louboutin boots, and innovative works made from Mylar, vinyl, and stainless steel, Native Fashion Now underscores Native concepts of dress and beauty, which are inextricably bound to identity and tradition in a rapidly changing world.

Image: Orlando Dugi (Diné [Navajo]) and Troy Sice (Zuni), The Guardian—Bringer of Thunder, Lightning and Rain handbag, 2013. Courtesy the National Museum of the American Indian.

Exhibition: "Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern"
Mar
3
Jul 23

Exhibition: "Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern"

  • The Brooklyn Museum

From the Brooklyn Museum

Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern takes a new look at how the renowned modernist artist proclaimed her progressive, independent lifestyle through a self-crafted public persona—including her clothing and the way she posed for the camera. The exhibition expands our understanding of O'Keeffe by focusing on her wardrobe, shown for the first time alongside key paintings and photographs. It confirms and explores her determination to be in charge of how the world understood her identity and artistic values.

The exhibition is organized in sections that run from her early years, when O’Keeffe crafted a signature style of dress that dispensed with ornamentation; to her years in New York, in the 1920s and 1930s, when a black-and-white palette dominated much of her art and dress; and to her later years in New Mexico, where her art and clothing changed in response to the surrounding colors of the Southwestern landscape. The final section explores the enormous role photography played in the artist’s reinvention of herself in the Southwest, when a younger generation of photographers visited her, solidifying her status as a pioneer of modernism and as a contemporary style icon.

Advance timed tickets go on sale January 24, 2017.

Image courtesy the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Exhibition: "Sara Berman's Closet"
Mar
6
Sep 5

Exhibition: "Sara Berman's Closet"

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The meticulously organized, modest closet in which Sara Berman (1920–2004)—an immigrant who traveled from Belarus to Palestine to New York—kept her all-white apparel and accessories both contained her life and revealed it. Inspired by the beauty and meaning of Berman's closet, the artists Maira and Alex Kalman (who are also Berman's daughter and grandson) have recreated the closet and its contents as an art installation.

This exhibition will represent Berman's life from 1982 to 2004, when she lived by herself in a small apartment in Greenwich Village. In her closet Berman lovingly organized her shoes, clothes, linens, beauty products, luggage, and other necessities. Although the clothing is of various tints—including cream, ivory, and ecru—it gives the impression of being all white.

With its neatly arranged stacks of starched and precisely folded clothing, the closet will be presented as a small period room in dialogue with The Met's recently installed Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room from 1882, which will feature clothing from the 1880s of the type that Arabella Worsham, a wealthy art patroness, might have worn. Despite vast differences of scale and ornament, and the separation of 100 years, the two rooms show there were similarities between the life stories of Berman and Worsham (c. 1850–1924). Both began as women of limited means who, by their own ingenuity, created new lives for themselves in New York City.

Image: Sara Berman, age 74 in Rome, Italy. Courtesy the Met's exhibition catalogue, Sara Berman's Closet.

Exhibition: "Adrian: Hollywood and Beyond"
Mar
7
Apr 1

Exhibition: "Adrian: Hollywood and Beyond"

  • The Museum at FIT

From the Museum at FIT:

Gilbert Adrian (1903-1959) built his career as a costume designer at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where he worked on more than 250 films, including The Wizard of Oz. His creations for glamorous actresses such as Joan Crawford and Katharine Hepburn inspired women of all ages. Macy’s and other retailers recognized this as a marketing opportunity and opened small boutiques within department stores across the country — “cinema shops,” featuring ensembles based on costumes seen in Hollywood films. To promote them, MGM released a short film in 1940 entitled “Hollywood: Style Center of the World.” Encouraged by the success of the cinema shops, Adrian opened a fashion house in 1942 and began to create looks that appealed to his new leading lady: the American woman.

This exhibition, Adrian: Hollywood and Beyond, highlights both Adrian’s ready-to-wear and his costumes,  while focusing on his innovative use of textiles. Beginning during his Hollywood days, fabric was central to Adrian’s aesthetic. He employed an arsenal of techniques — such as appliqué, piecing, mitering, pleating, and draping — to build dynamic garments in which the materials are as celebrated as they are integral to the design. Adrian worked with and endorsed different textile manufacturers throughout his career. Indeed, his final collection in 1952 was dedicated to the “beauty” and “integrity of fabric.”

Image: A 1952 costume by Adrian for the film, Lovely to Look At.

Exhibition: “Margiela – The Hermès Years”
Mar
31
Aug 27

Exhibition: “Margiela – The Hermès Years”

  • Mode Museum

From the Mode Museum

From 31 March 2017 to 27 August 2017, MoMu is displaying Belgian stylist Martin Margiela’s Hermès collections from 1997 to 2003 for the first time. As well as this, the tribute exhibition also explores the relationship during these years between these collections and his own label, Maison Martin Margiela. Groundbreaking deconstruction and timeless luxury – the two worlds of designer Martin Margiela – are the starting point of the exhibition ‘‘Margiela – The Hermès Years’’.

Tickets to this exhibition can be purchased here

Image (courtesy MoMu): HERMÈS “Losanges” Spring/Summer 2003 - photo Nathaniel Goldberg | MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA Spring/Summer 1989 - photo Raf Coolen - graphic design Jelle Jespers

 


Talk: " Fashion and Celebrity in 1960s France"
Mar
21
6:00 pm18:00

Talk: " Fashion and Celebrity in 1960s France"

  • FIT, Katie Murphy Amphitheatre

From the Museum at FIT:

Join Colleen Hill, curator of Paris Refashioned, 1957–1968, for a discussion of the influence of popular culture on 1960s French fashion. Through an examination of style icons such as Brigitte Bardot and Françoise Hardy, the 1966 Jean-Luc Godard film Masculin Féminin, and Elle magazine, Hill will show how the overlap between music, films, and media helped to shape the dynamic fashion industry during this era.

Please note that seating is on a first-come, first-served basis with RSVP. 

Image: I.D. (Emmanuelle Khanh), dress, 1966. Courtesy, Museum at FIT.

In Conversation: Tracy Reese and Elizabeth Way
Mar
15
7:00 pm19:00

In Conversation: Tracy Reese and Elizabeth Way

  • FIT, John E. Reeves Great Hall

From the Museum at FIT:

Join Tracy Reese and Black Fashion Designers co-curator Elizabeth Way for a lively talk about Reese’s career as a designer. Reese crafts colorful, feminine pieces for the modern woman. She helms a multi-line lifestyle brand, and her clients have included first lady Michelle Obama. Her design philosophy is rooted in a commitment to bringing out the beauty in women of all shapes, sizes, and colors.

Please note that seating is on a first-come, first-served basis with RSVP. 

Image: Tracy Reese dress, pre-Fall 2015. Courtesy Museum at FIT.

Call for Papers: "BEAUTY"
Mar
15
5:00 pm17:00

Call for Papers: "BEAUTY"

Issued by Jillian Baez (College of Staten Island, CUNY) and Natalie Havlin (LaGuardia Community College, CUNY), to be published as a special edition of WSQ.

The politics of beauty have been heavily debated with feminist studies and LGBTQ studies. While some feminists critiqued beauty as an extension of patriarchal gender regimes (beauty as a site of systemic oppression), other feminists reconceptualized beauty as a form of play and expression of identity. At the same time, women of color feminists, particularly black and Chicana feminists, such as bell hooks, Amalia Mesa-Bains, and Maria Elena Cepeda, acknowledge the significance of beauty—not only as personal adornment, but as a mode of survival. Moving away from white second wave feminists that dismissed beauty as mere compliance with patriarchal expectations, some women of color feminists embraced beauty as a site of agency. At the same time, LGBTQ studies and critical disability studies critique heteronormative beauty regimes and explore the potentials of non-gender-normative stylizations and more inclusive modes of recognition. This issue places new interventions in gender and sexuality studies in conversation with these debates.


We are seeking papers that take a critical and transgressive approach to gendered and sexualized conceptions of beauty. What is gendered beauty? How can we know that something is beautiful? Is the pursuit of beauty a fruitful endeavor in gender and sexuality studies? How is beauty being redefined, especially in light of race, disability, class, gender, sexuality and economics? How are dominant beauty regimes steeped in racism, gender binaries, sexism, able-bodiedness, homophobia, colonialism, and capitalism? How do marginalized communities engage in beauty practices as forms of survival and resistance? How does beauty undergird countercultural movements? What is the relationship between beauty and aesthetics? 

Early germinal feminist scholarship dismisses beauty as a form of patriarchal subjugation. For example, in her classic text The Beauty Myth (1990), Naomi Wolf calls attention to the unrealistic beauty standards expected of women in our male-dominated society. In Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body (1993), Susan Bordo builds on Wolf’s critique and links popular culture representations of beauty to female pathology, particularly eating disorders. Bordo also notes that women’s beauty regimes are not only sexist, but also largely Eurocentric. Black feminists also note the Eurocentrism in dominant beauty regimes, but at the same time note that beauty politics are complicated in black communities. For example, Maxine Leeds Craig in her book Ain’t I A Beauty Queen?: Black Women, Beauty, and the Politics of Race (2002), and Shirley Tate in her book Black Beauty: Aesthetics, Stylization, Politics (2009) illustrate the importance of affirming beauty amongst black women given white supremacy in the dominant culture. In Fresh Lipstick: Redressing Fashion and Feminism (2006) Linda Scott challenges Wolf’s and Bordo’s assumptions by providing a historical account of the ways that stylization have been important for women as a form of personal expression. In doing so, Scott decouples beauty and objectification in mainstream feminist ideals.

Scholarly articles and inquiries should be sent to guest issue editors Jillian Báez and Natalie Havlin at WSQBeautyissue@gmail.com. We will give priority consideration to submissions received by March 15, 2017. Please send complete articles, not abstracts. Submissions should not exceed 6,360 words (including un-embedded notes and works cited) and should comply with the formatting guidelines at http://www.feministpress.org/wsq/submission-guidelines.

Poetry, fiction, essay, and memoir submissions will also be considered. Please contact WSQpoetry@gmail.com or WSQCreativeProse@gmail.com for further information.

 

In conversation: "New Directions in Menswear"
Mar
14
6:00 pm18:00

In conversation: "New Directions in Menswear"

  • FIT, Katie Murphy Amphitheatre

From the Museum at FIT

Join Alexander Joseph, editor of FIT’s Hue magazine, for a lively conversation about the diverse future of menswear with four designers: Auston Björkman, founder of Sir New York, a “gender non-specific menswear” firm; Andrew Morrison, winner of the 2016 Out magazine Fashion Vanguard Award; and Abdul Abasi and Greg Rosborough, who draw on their military and athletic backgrounds for their forward-thinking tailoring and sportswear using natural textiles.

Please note that seating is on a first-come, first-served basis with RSVP. 

Image: Sir New York, all three ensembles, USA. Photograph by Christopher Hall for Hue magazine, winter 2017. Courtesy, Museum at FIT

Conference: "Fashioning the Black Body in Bondage & Freedom"
Mar
4
10:00 am10:00

Conference: "Fashioning the Black Body in Bondage & Freedom"

  • Weeksville Heritage Center

Organized by scholars Jonathan Michael Square and Noel Corbin, hosted by the Weeksville Heritage Center:

Scholars often encounter difficulty finding sufficient source material when researching the way in which enslaved people have understood themselves and their place in the world. Yet, the experience of Africans who have been enslaved and of their descendants is not wholly absent from historical records. One entry point into acquiring an understanding of the experience of these enslaved people is through how they were forced or chose to dress and adorn themselves. Fashion was one of the few arenas in which slaves had an opportunity to exert a modicum of control because it was, in spite a number of constraints, open to their adaptation. For slaves, as for all groups, fashion has constituted a rich, unique medium for complex cultural expression. This conference will explore some of the many facets of the intersection between slavery and fashion, bringing scholars, designers, and artists into conversation around this understudied (and often challenged) topic.

FSJ is proud to support contributor Jonathan Michael Square with this endeavor, as well as FSJ Co-Founder Kim Jenkins, who will moderate the panel, "Fashion and the Peculiar Institution".

Photo: "Sarah Forbes" by artist Ayana V. Jackson, courtesy the web projectFashioning the Self in Slavery and Freedom.

Book Signing & "Leather" Tasting with Katja Gruijters
Mar
1
6:00 pm18:00

Book Signing & "Leather" Tasting with Katja Gruijters

  • Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator

From the Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator

Join us for a truly one of a kind event in collaboration with the Pratt Institute and Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator with food designer Katja Gruijters and Judith van den Boom, Department Head at Product Design at ArtEZ University of the Arts, Arnhem, in the Netherlands. This lecture is generously being sponsored by Pratt Institute and the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce.

Katja’s lecture will focus on the idea of obesity across industries, looking at how we as consumers have become “overweight” from the over-consumption of fashion, food and information. We’ll start out with a “Welcome Chrysanthemum Tea” accompanied by chocolate lace tiles made by Katja, followed by a book signing of Food Design, “leather tastings” and a takeaway recipe card with dried chrysanthemum tea to make at home.

Schedule:

Welcome Chrysanthemum Tea/Book Signing: 6-6:30 pm
Food design lecture/Q&A: 6:30-7:30 pm
Book signing: 7:30-8 pm

General public: $20
Emerging and Studying members: $15
Pioneering members: $10
All Pratt students with student ID: free

RSVP here.

 

Symposium: "The International Politics of Fashion"
Feb
16
1:30 pm13:30

Symposium: "The International Politics of Fashion"

  • The New School, Orozco Room, Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall

From Parsons School of Design:

The afternoon symposium will feature contributors to Andreas Benkhe (ed), The International Politics of Fashion: Being Fab in a Dangerous World(Routledge, 2017) Presentations include: 

Introduction: Fashion and International Politics, Hazel Clark, Professor of Design Studies and fashion Studies, Research Chair of Fashion, Parsons

‘Politicising Fashion, Fashioning the Political’, Andreas Behnke, Associate Professor of International Political Theory, University of Reading, UK

 Response, Otto von Busch, Associate Professor, Integrated Design, Parsons

 "Beyond Soft Power: Cultural Power from India and China Today through Film’, LHM Ling, Professor of International Affairs, The New School

‘Fashion statements: wearing trousers in Sudan’, Linda Bishai, Director of North Africa Programs, US Institute of Peace & Professorial lecturer, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Image courtesy Routledge Publishers.

Panel: "The Trump Effect: Immigration, Apparel Manufacturing and the Environment"
Feb
7
6:30 pm18:30

Panel: "The Trump Effect: Immigration, Apparel Manufacturing and the Environment"

  • BROOKLYN FASHION + DESIGN ACCELERATOR

From the Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator:

Post-elections, the world is reeling from the possible repercussions of a president-elect that has voiced major changes in how the US will respond to immigrant populations, environmental issues and global manufacturing. Also included in all three areas is the impact on women and women’s rights moving forward in 2017 and beyond. Join us at our February edition of Rock, Paper, Scissors where we bring together respected experts to closely examine the potential consequences on the apparel industry.

In addition to a panel, we’ll be featuring up to ten local organizations who will have tables at the event to offer individual involvement regarding NYC immigration, apparel manufacturing as well as the environment.

Current organizations representing at The Trump Effect-more TBA:
-Save the Garment Center (Erica Wolf, Samanta Cortes, Anthony Lilore)
-Democracy at Work Institute
-Fwd.us
-NYC Fair Trade Coalition
-Forum for the Future
-Social Accountability International (SAI)
-Immigration Legal Services & New Americans Hotline

Doors open/Meet & greet with NYC immigration, environmental and manufacturing groups: 6:30 pm
Panel begins: 7 pm
Q&A 7:45 pm
Wrap up meet and greets and event ends: 8:30pm

Tickets to this panel cost $10.00, and you can RSVP here.

Image courtesy the BF+DA.

Black Fashion Designers Symposium
Feb
6
10:00 am10:00

Black Fashion Designers Symposium

  • FIT Katie Murphy Amphitheatre Fred P. Pomerantz Art and Design Center

From the Museum at FIT

The Museum at FIT will host a one-day symposium on February 6, 2017, featuring talks by designers, models, journalists, and scholars on African diasporic culture and fashion. The accompanying exhibition, Black Fashion Designers, examines the significant but often unrecognized, impact that designers of African descent have had on fashion design. Join celebrity stylist June Ambrose, reporter Teri Agins, designers Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs, and models Bethann Hardison and Veronica Webb in this educational exploration of fashion, diversity and more.

Please note that seating will be on a first come, first served basis with RSVP. 

ALTHOUGH THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT, IT WILL BE BROADCASTED ONLINE VIA LIVESTREAM

You can view the full schedule for the symposium here.

Photo: Grace Wales Bonner ensemble, Spring 2017. Image courtesy the Museum at FIT. 

Symposium: "The Space Between: Psyche, Body, Skin, Environment"
Feb
3
9:30 am09:30

Symposium: "The Space Between: Psyche, Body, Skin, Environment"

  • RCA Lecture Theatre 1 – Kensington Campus

From the Royal College of Art

The Space Between: Psyche, Body, Skin, Environment is an inter-disciplinary one-day symposium bringing together key thinkers from a range of disciplines to consider ideas around clothing, cloth and protection in contemporary society; in particular those associated with psyche, dress and the environment. Clothing and dress are often interpreted as forms of literal, metaphorical or psychic protection; from a suit of armour, to a hockey player’s padding, a heavy wool coat, to a businessperson’s suit.

The symposium seeks to ask what does clothing as protection mean in the context of contemporary society. As well as physical protection from environmental risk how does it protect one from the social mores or precepts of society? Why are some cultures and societal groups more concerned with this than others? Are contemporary forms of exposure and nakedness or nudity now also viewed as forms of pre-emptive protection? Do we now need more or less protection? And who (or what) do we need protecting from?

You can read the entire itinerary here and register for your tickets here.

Panel Discussion: "Performing Fashion: New York City"
Jan
30
6:30 pm18:30

Panel Discussion: "Performing Fashion: New York City"

  • NYU Einstein Auditorium

From the NYU MA Costume Studies program

The curators of the 80WSE show will host In Conversation with…, a panel discussion with performers of fashion from the worlds of art, music, burlesque, and design in conjunction with the exhibition at 80WSE. Curators include Thea Macdonald, Olivia Warschaw, Nicole Truscinski, Kristen Owens, Justine Lacy, Netta Rosin, Sabrina Kridler, and Luise Gerardo Colón Torres. 

 

Fashion Week: Stockholm
Jan
29
Jan 31

Fashion Week: Stockholm

  • Stockholm Sweden

From Stockholm Fashion Week

Since its inception in 2005 Fashion Week Stockholm has established itself as the leading fashion week in Northern Europe. Twice per year Sweden’s most interesting designers and brands showcase their upcoming collections to press, buyers and influencers from across the globe. Held in Stockholm the week is focused around the official arenas Berns Salonger and Kulturhuset Stadsteatern in the heart of the city.

The full schedule of events can be found here.

 

Lecture/Seminar: CIAD Winter Exchange: "Racism in Fashion part 2"
Jan
26
6:30 pm18:30

Lecture/Seminar: CIAD Winter Exchange: "Racism in Fashion part 2"

  • Rootstein Hopkins Space, London College of Fashion

From The Costume Institute of the African Diaspora:

Join us on Thursday 26th January as conclude our 2 part presentation on Racism in Fashion. We will discuss different aspects of racism within the fashion industry, how it manifests and what can be done about it. We will tackle visual colonisation, skin bleaching and tokenism amongst other subjects

This is the final part of a 2 part lecture, we hope you will be able to join us for healthy discussion and hearty debate

This event will be 2 hours long with a lecture/ seminar for the first hour followed by networking and refreshments for the second hour.

Image courtesy CIAD.

Exhibition: "A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes @ Bowery"
Jan
24
Feb 12

Exhibition: "A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes @ Bowery"

  • Parasol @ Bowery

From Parasol Projects

A new fashion exhibition focusing on conceptual, artistic, and extreme footwear, aims to reevaluate the occult power and mystery of shoes. Through more than 60 extraordinary examples, all created by the distinguished alumni and students of Israel’s most prestigious academy – the Bezalel Academy, A Walk Of Art treads the line between art and fashion. These innovative and radical designs aim to defy space, anatomy, and gravity, pivoting around sculptural methods and blending traditional craft and nontraditional materials: from renowned artist Sigalit Landau’s salt-crystallized shoes to porcelain, glass, metal, wood, and 3D printed shoes, impossible platforms, wedges, and heels, this exhibition creates a meandering journey between the ephemeral and the perennial, the beautiful and the painful, the mythology and reality of some of the most charged and coveted objects in fashion history. 

This exhibition was curated by FSJ community member, Ya'ara Keydar.

Shoe: Aya Feldman, HyBird, 2016. Photo: Talya Crudo, courtesy Benzalel Academy.

Women's March on Washington
Jan
21
10:00 am10:00

Women's March on Washington

  • Independence Ave and Third St SW Washington D.C. United States

From Women's March:

In the spirit of democracy and honoring the champions of human rights, dignity, and justice who have come before us, we join in diversity to show our presence in numbers too great to ignore. The Women’s March on Washington will send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.

You can read the rest of the Women's March statement of purpose here.

Lecture: "Bottling the Zeitgeist: Classic Perfumes That Defined Their Eras, 1950 to 2000"
Jan
19
7:30 pm19:30

Lecture: "Bottling the Zeitgeist: Classic Perfumes That Defined Their Eras, 1950 to 2000"

  • Chandelier Creative

From Think Olio:

In this Olio, we'll explore a half-century of perfumery through a selection of iconic feminine fragrances. Can a perfume encapsulate the postwar prosperity of the 1950s or the sexual revolution of the 1960s? Can a fragrance evoke the personality of a 1980s diva or a 1990s Generation X-er? You've probably heard that perfume should be applied to the pulse points, but can a scent also capture the figurative pulse of a decade? We’ll ponder these questions as we sample classic perfumes from 1950 to 2000 and learn what inspired them and how they "bottled" their cultural moments. Just like works of visual art, fashion, or architecture, perfumes sometimes have stories and styles that endure; breathe deeply and open your mind to their possibilities.

Open bar with wine and cocktails; $15.00 to reserve your seat.

Image courtesy Think Olio.

 

Lecture: "Fashion and Everyday Life: London and New York c.1890-2010"
Jan
19
6:00 pm18:00

Lecture: "Fashion and Everyday Life: London and New York c.1890-2010"

  • RHS East London College of Fashion

From the University College of London

Postgraduate Communities Lecture Series 3 – Fashion and Subject Positions

Fashion and Everyday Life: London and New York c.1890-2010

Speaker: Hazel Clark, Professor of Design Studies and Fashion Studies and Research Chair of Fashion at Parsons School Of Design, New York

Based on a forthcoming co-authored book (Bloomsbury 2017), which argues the significance of fashion in the everyday lives of ordinary people, this talk will present cases that examine fashion and subject positions, encompassing the subjects of race, class and gender, in London and New York in the long twentieth century.

This event is free and open to the public and you can reserve your seat here.

Image courtesy Bloomsbury Publishing. 

Exhibition: "Performing Fashion: New York City"
Jan
17
Feb 2

Exhibition: "Performing Fashion: New York City"

  • 80WSE Gallery

From the NYU MA Costume Studies program:

NYU’s Costume Studies MA program opens an exhibition on fashion and performance on January 17th, in the 80WSE Gallery. The exhibition, co-curated by a group of eight students, explores the performative aspects of dress and the body as enacted by individuals and groups in New York City.

As the city itself is a stage for those seeking a spotlight, the exhibition surveys a variety of ways that fashion has been integral to performance in New York City. The exhibition’s approach to the term “fashion” is inclusive; a private moment or lavish costume party are equally worthy of examination as an expression of identity. It encompass concepts from the stage to the street, the personal, artistic, sexual, and political. Studio 54, burlesque, and 1980s Fire Island costume fêtes are among the spaces of performance considered in the exhibition.

A reception at 80WSE will be held on Wednesday, January 18, from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Call for Papers: "INTERWOVEN: Dress that Crosses Borders and Challenges Boundaries"
Jan
15
6:59 pm18:59

Call for Papers: "INTERWOVEN: Dress that Crosses Borders and Challenges Boundaries"

Issued by Jennifer Daley, Chairman, The Association of Dress Historians

The Association of Dress Historians (ADH) supports and promotes the study and professional practice of dress and textile history. A CALL FOR PAPERS has been released for our annual International Conference of Dress Historians, to be held on Friday, 27 October 2017 at The Art Workers’ Guild, 6 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AT, UK. The title and theme of the conference is: INTERWOVEN: Dress that Crosses Borders and Challenges Boundaries.

Topics of potential papers could include (but are not limited to):

• Cross-cultural appropriation of clothing and textiles;
• Representation of genderless dress through subcultural style;
• Androgynous dressing from the high street to the royal court;
• Android to cyborg: fashion and technology’s ongoing relationship;
• Fashion designers who challenge boundaries in innovative ways;
• Icons who adopt clothing and textiles that challenge boundaries;
• Clothing and textiles that cross political or state barriers;
• Uniforms and occupational dress that have crossed into popularity;
• Industrial and manufacturing processes that have crossed boundaries.

Please submit your conference paper proposal for a twenty-minute presentation to jennifer.daley@kcl.ac.uk as a .doc or .docx file (saved as firstname_lastname) that includes your name, email address, affiliation, descriptive paper title, a 200-word abstract, and a 100-word biography. We also encourage proposals for themed panels of three speakers.

The deadline for submissions is 23:59 GMT, Sunday, 15 January 2017. Notification of the outcome of proposals will be advised by 23:59 GMT, Friday, 20 January 2017.

If you would like to join the email newsletter list of The Association of Dress Historians, please email jennifer.daley@kcl.ac.uk.

Shop: The Ethical Writers Coalition Holiday Gift Shop
Dec
10
11:00 am11:00

Shop: The Ethical Writers Coalition Holiday Gift Shop

  • Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator

From the Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator:

Join your friends from the Ethical Writer’s Coalition to shop some of their favorite sustainable and ethical brands in New York City. Hosted at the Brooklyn Fashion + Design Accelerator, this gift shop covers everything from organic beauty and food to men’s & women’s accessories. With something for everyone, and everything with a meaningful story attached, you won’t want to miss this opportunity to stuff those stockings!

So instead of hitting the mall this holiday season, check your loved ones off the gift-list with items that they’ll love, and you can feel good about giving. Just imagine their faces when they unwrap a pair of Study NY’s cozy alpaca mittens, a pack of Indigo Jones’ homemade cookies, or one of Teknikio’s wearable technology tool kits! In addition to shopping the brands we love, you can wrap your purchases at (recently seen on Project Runway’s Fashion Startup!) FABSCRAP’s sustainable gift-wrap station and enjoy lightly caffeinated refreshments from Dona Chai and Guayaki Yerba Mate while you mix and mingle in great company.

This event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is encouraged.

Image: Navy alpaca mittens from Study NY.

 

 

Exhibition: "Surrogate Skin: The Biology of Objects"
Nov
18
Feb 26

Exhibition: "Surrogate Skin: The Biology of Objects"

  • Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts

From MoCADA :

Through the works of Doreen Garner and Keisha Scarville, Surrogate Skin: The Biology of Objects is an exposition on the consciousness of materials and how they bear the memory of lived experience.

Recalling the medical exploitation of black women’s bodies through grotesque arrangements of silicone, pearls, hair weave, and surgical instruments, Doreen Garner simultaneously refuses and seduces the viewer’s curiosity, effectively returning their encroaching gaze. As a siren for perspectives of black women that have been historically excluded from a more celebratory narrative on scientific achievement, such as Henrietta Lacks, and Anarcha, Betsy, and Lucy, three of the only known slave women subject to unanesthetized surgeries performed by Dr. J. Marion Sims, Garner makes explicit the relationship between medical abuse and the socialization of black women. .

Keisha Scarville mines the intimate histories that exist in clothing, adorning her body in the dress of her deceased mother as a way to conjure her in the present. Considering how absence can be tangibly manifested through the material remains of a person, Scarville offers discrete representations of the body against realist and abstract landscapes that suggest how identity can be informed through a sum of often contrasting elements. As she captures the mark left on commonplace objects by individual and collective family histories, the work functions equally as a memorial for and reinvigoration of the departed, resulting, comfortably, in more questions than answers.

Titled from a conversation with Scarville on her work, Surrogate Skin: The Biology of Objects repositions object as subject. While the false representation of black women’s bodies informs Garner’s lustrous amalgamations of simulated flesh and organs, the idea of what can no longer be seen animates the drapings in Scarville’s photographs and installations. Achieving compositions that reference women’s bodies from internal and external perspectives, both artists consider how objects implicate the viewer in their conceptualization.

The Opening Reception for this exhibition will be held on Friday, November 18, 2016, 7:00-10:00pm. You can RSVP here.

Image: Doreen Garner. Pearl Necklace, 2016. Silicone and pearls. 6 x 4.5 x 1.5 inches.

Exhibition: "Masterworks: Unpacking Fashion"
Nov
18
Feb 5

Exhibition: "Masterworks: Unpacking Fashion"

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Costume Institute's fall 2016 exhibition features significant acquisitions of the past 10 years and explores how the department has honed its collecting strategy to amass masterworks of the highest aesthetic and technical quality, including iconic works by designers who have changed fashion history and advanced fashion as an art form. During the seven decades since The Costume Institute became part of The Met in 1946, that collecting strategy has shifted from creating a collection of Western high fashion that is encyclopedic in breadth to one focused on acquiring masterworks.

The exhibition, in the Anna Wintour Costume Center, highlights approximately 60 of these masterworks from the early 18th century to the present. The Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery is organized chronologically with ensembles shown on platforms resembling oversized packing crates. Each object—primarily women's wear, as well as some men's wear ensembles and a selection of accessories—is accompanied by an in-depth explanation of its significance within the canon of fashion history.

Ball Gown, Viktor and Rolf, spring/summer 2010. Image courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Talk: Fashioning Diaspora: Ayqa Khan, Sharon Heijin Lee, Vanita Reddy, Meera Sethi, and Thuy Linh Tu
Nov
16
7:00 pm19:00

Talk: Fashioning Diaspora: Ayqa Khan, Sharon Heijin Lee, Vanita Reddy, Meera Sethi, and Thuy Linh Tu

  • NYU Steinhardt Pless Hall Lounge

From the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU:

As part of the Institute’s ongoing exploration of beauty practice, fashion, labor, and diaspora, we host Vanita Reddy (Texas A&M University), whose Fashioning Diaspora: Beauty, Femininity, and South Asian American Culture (Temple University Press, 2016) “is essential reading for scholarship on beauty” (erin Khuê Ninh). Reddy carefully maps how transnational itineraries of beauty and fashion shape South Asian American cultural identities and racialized belonging. Ayqa Khan is a Brooklyn-based artist and photographer whose digital illustrations of South Asian women aim to normalize body hair, and raise questions about hair removal practices. Through her work notions of “feminine” beauty are interrogated and re-presented. The work of Meera Sethi, a Toronto-based visual artist, explores fashion and the politics of dress, while foregrounding queer, diasporic, and post-colonial histories. She presents recent projects including Upping the Aunty, a multidimensional work comprised of street fashion photography, a coloring book for adults, and paintings that place the figure of the “Aunty” at the center of fashionability. Sharon Heijin Lee and Thuy Linh Tu (both from the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis) serve as discussants.

Cosponsored by the NYU Center for Multicultural Education & Programs and the A/P/A Studies Program in the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.

You can register for this event here.

Symposium: "Eastern Exposure: Dress and Textiles in China and Japan"
Nov
12
2:00 pm14:00

Symposium: "Eastern Exposure: Dress and Textiles in China and Japan"

  • NYU Einstein Auditorium (ground floor)

Presented by the NYU Steinhardt Costume MA Program:

This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars to examine continuity and innovation in dress and textiles in the evolving fashion industries of China and Japan.

Schedule

1:45 – 2:00       Check-in

2:00 – 2:10       Welcome
                         Nancy Deihl
                         Director, NYU Costume Studies

                         Introduction
                         Daniel James Cole
                         NYU Costume Studies faculty and organizer of Eastern Exposure

2:10 – 2:30       Curating Fashion in a Globalized World: A New Dialogue
                         Neil Wu
                         Emerging independent scholar and fashion historian

2:30 – 3:00       Keynote Speech: Devising Imperial Wardrobe: An Exercise in Qing Dynasty Statecraft
                         John E. Vollmer
                         Independent scholar, curator, and cultural consultant

3:00 – 3:20      The Cheongsam: Modernity, Imaginary and Nation
                         Dr. Hazel Clark
                         Research chair of Fashion, Parsons School of Design, The New School, and author of The Cheongsam (Images of Asia)

3:20 – 3:40      A Simple Sash from the Southern Islands of Okinawa: Identity and Resistance in Yaeyama
                        Dr. Amanda Mayer Stinchecum
                        Research Fellow, Institute of Okinawan Studies

3:40 – 4:00     The Global Popularity of Japanese Lolita Fashion: An Alternative Definition of Female Beauty
                        Dr. Yuniya Kawamura
                        Professor of Sociology, Fashion Institute of Technology

4:00 – 4:30      Q&A Session 

4:30 – 5:30      Closing Reception
                        5th floor
 

This event is free and open to the public. Advanced registration is required.
For more information, contact costume.studies@nyu.edu

Lecture: "Bottling the Zeitgeist: Classic Perfumes That Defined Their Eras"
Nov
10
7:30 pm19:30

Lecture: "Bottling the Zeitgeist: Classic Perfumes That Defined Their Eras"

  • Chandelier Creative

Presented by Think Olio with Chandelier Creative

Just like works of visual art, fashion, or architecture, perfumes often have stories and styles that endure. From Paris to New York, from the fin de siècle to the Roaring Twenties, World War II, and beyond, explore a half-century of perfumery through five iconic fragrances. We’ll sample these scents while learning who created them, what inspired them, and why they’re considered classics.

This one-night class will be taught by Dr. Jessica Murphy and $20.00 will reserve your seat. Includes open bar with wine and cocktails!

Image courtesy Think Olio.

Panel Discussion: "Field to Frock: Fashion Lessons from the Slow Food Movement"
Nov
10
6:00 pm18:00

Panel Discussion: "Field to Frock: Fashion Lessons from the Slow Food Movement"

  • Katie Murphy Amphitheatre at FIT

From The Museum at FIT:

Learn how practices developed by the Slow Food Movement may also benefit the fashion industry. Panel moderator Summer Rayne Oakes, director of marketing for Foodstand, a company that promotes good eating habits, speaks with chef Daphne Cheng, a pioneer in plant-based cuisine; fashion designer Jussara Lee; and Richard McCarthy, executive director of Slow Food USA.

All Fashion Culture events are free, but registration is required; register online here, call 212 217.4585, or email museuminfo@fitnyc.edu.