Cultural Mediators in the Digital Age
May
3
May 4

Cultural Mediators in the Digital Age

September 4, 2017, King's College London

This Symposium is organised by the School of Communications at University Adolfo Ibanez (UAI), the Culture, Media and Creative Industries Department at King’s College (KCL), and the London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London (UAL). 

Following from the influential work of Pierre Bourdieu, cultural intermediaries (CIs) have been typically analysed within cultural studies and sociology (Smith-Maguire and Matthews 2013; Nixon and du Gay 2002; O’Connor 2015) as significant mediators of culture, shaping cultural forms and identities; for example, in fashion (Blumer 1969; Braham 1997; Entwistle 2006; Fine and Leopold 1993), music (Hesmondhalgh 2007), food (Bob, et.al. 2013) masculinity within popular culture (Nixon 1996, 2003). This early cultural intermediaries literature was important in establishing a more complex and dynamic relationship between production and consumption by examining the work of influential ‘taste-makers’ located within key professional spaces and institutions (publishing, fashion industry, etc.). However, in the digital age, today’s CIs also include fashion bloggers and vloggers, Youtubers (Rocamora, forthcoming, 2017), music and food bloggers, and so on, who are examples of new forms of labour, as well as practices where cultural value is generated and circulated across digital spaces. Further, ideas about the ‘prosumer’ and ‘prosumption’ challenge the uni-directional view of flows of influence: consumers are emerging as ‘experts’ of the flows they are consuming (Baym and Burnett 2009), as well as ‘cultural mediators’ or ‘intermediaries’ (Arriagada 2014; Entwistle 2009; Bourdieu 1984; Rocamora 2011; 2016), bringing ‘a range of cultural things to markets: goods, images, tastes, aesthetics’ (Entwistle 2009: 15). In addition, science and technology studies (STS) and actor-network-theory (ANT) have challenged ideas about mediation to include non-human actors within these networks and flows of goods. 

In this Symposium we will explore how much of the early cultural intermediaries literature within cultural studies (emerging from the late 1980s-1990s) and across a range of industries (fashion, music, popular media/magazines, for example) is relevant to today’s cultural forms in the digital age. Specifically, the aim of the symposium is to gather experts on cultural industries to discuss and analyse how consumers’ practices performed in digital spaces (e.g. blog, social media, and websites) are facilitating the emergency of new cultural and economic forms in this industry. It will be cross- disciplinary and cross-sector, seeking also to examine the differences, synergies and similarities across key cultural industries (for example, fashion, music, print/publishing, film, food, gaming). 

We invite participants to send abstracts that explore the practices, identities, and discourses of cultural mediators in the digital age from a broad range of disciplines – including sociology, media studies, geography, anthropology, cultural studies, STS. Questions and topics include but are not limited to:

  • How do CIs create meaning and valorise cultural products in the digital age? 
  • How do their practices vary across industries (e.g. music, media, fashion, design, and food) in the digital age? 
  • What role do digital technologies (particularly social media) play in the practices of CIs?
  • What forms of labour are emerging from consumers’ social media practices of mediation around goods and flows produced in the cultural industry?
  • How are the off- and online practices of CIs regulated, and by whom?
  • What type (s) of value (s) (e.g. economic, symbolic) are consumers producing through their online practices of mediation?
  • What kind of knowledge do consumers produce and circulate through social media in relation to flows and goods produced in the cultural industry?
  • Theoretically, what kind of sociological, cultural, and economic concepts and theories serve to understand online practices of mediation in relation to flows and goods produced in the cultural industry?

Please send abstracts (350 words) with a short bio (100 words) by May the 3rd to: symposiumcmda@gmail.com  

The abstract should include theoretical and methodological discussions and have to be submitted and presented in English. Please include relevant biographical information as well. On submission of the proposal, only the proposing author will receive an email confirming receipt. 

The Symposium organising committee will assess all proposals and communicate results by May the 29th.  The program will be available by June the 22nd. 
Participation in the Symposium will cost £50 and £30 (students).

Self Portrait in Costumes: New Identities at Play
May
30
May 31

Self Portrait in Costumes: New Identities at Play

Conference/Workshop, 24 November 2017, Ecole des Beaux Arts de Nantes

Organized jointly by the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Université de Nantes, and Université de Bourgogne

Proposals of approximately 300 words may be submitted to valeriemorisson@gmail.comjulie.morere@univ-nantes.fr and emmanuelle.cherel@gmail.com, along with a short biographical note before 30th May 2017.

Self-portraits admittedly waver between earnest confession (as stressed by Philippe Le Jeune in Le Pacte autobiographique, Seuil, coll. “Poétique”, 1975) and concealment. It is often a representation of the self that goes beyond the idea of the artist as subject in order to tackle wider notions of subjectivity. In a similar way, the self-portrait in costume or disguise (in painting, photo or video) may either protect the artist from self-disclosure or put his own self at risk. It is a multi-faceted genre or mode that this conference purports to explore. In painting, clothing has recently received a long-deserved interest: in  Fabric of Vision : Dress and Drapery in Painting (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016), Anne Hollander underscores the fact that clothing does matter as much as any other component of the composition in the eyes of the painter. This applies even more forcefully to self-portraits in costume.

Some classical painters have playfully included an image of themselves in period costumes in their compositions or painted self-portraits in costume. Veronese features dressed in white in The Wedding Feast at Cana (1562) while Rembrandt portrayed himself in oriental costume in The artist in an Oriental Costume (1631). The act of self-portrayal –as a creative process—may be viewed as an intimate act and private performance or as a staging of the self for public display, questioning the social and political status of the artist, the individual or his community. The costume inevitably introduces a twist or trick that may be playful or more intriguing: this strategy has not been fully explored and deserves more attention.

Given that self-portraiture is an experimental and mediated exploration of the self (and a nearly unavoidable step for many artists in the intimacy of the creative process), it is an invitation to explore lighting, stances, and costume either humorously or more introspectively. Costuming or masquerading, that is seemingly assuming someone else’s identity, may partake of a documentary or fictitious project and rely on various autobiographical modes. The artist may metamorphose him/herself exploring different time-periods, geographical areas, or identities; the dress may be normative or conversely singular. The manipulation of the self in the visual arts may be liberating, as is the case in the tradition of the masquerade or fantasy photographic portraits: through costuming the artists free themselves from the constraints of society and its prevalent dress-codes. Handicrafts, intermediality and bricolage may be used to costume the self in a process-oriented approach sometimes close to artistic performance. The body may disappear entirely and the artist be buried in the costume, faceless; conversely the artist may be reduced to a shadow or use synecdoche to escape exposure.

The costume (attire, dress, props, or make-up) being more than a sign of belonging entails performative embodiments and blurs the identification process thereby disrupting the conventions of self-portraiture. As a matter of fact, the self-portrait in costume often entails narrativity and fictitious self-representations in which the artist may drift towards fantasy and virtuality to explore complex forms of otherness.

Portraying oneself in exotic attire is a means of drawing the spectator’s attention to the artificiality of portrait-painting and the theatricality of social roles. The self-portrait in costume, relying as it does on shared sartorial norms and social codes, articulates culture and counterculture and may debunk myths, stereotypes and normative discourse centered on the body. The self-portrait in costume thereby constitutes a puzzle for the viewer who finds himself trapped into the contrivances of the staging. When costuming also means revisiting previous images and relies on intericonicity, the viewer may be complicit and laugh or mislaugh at the quote or distortion. Contemporary photographers and video-artists conceive fictional or fictitious autobiographies inducing generic and referential instability. Artists related to postmodern and postcolonial art portray themselves in costume to critically explore identity construction and the notions of authenticity and nostalgia. In a postcolonial perspective, self-portraits in costume tends to question the politics of representation, power relationships in the modern society, representation of minorities and a multiplicity of possible identifications torn between cultural and social contradictions. Other self-portraits are haunted by a nightmarish vision of the artist as Other, referring to the divided self from a psychoanalytic perspective. The advent of the post-human has made these imaginary explorations more tangible.

There is, we suggest, more than imaginary playfulness in these self-staged performances: the self-portrait in disguise may verge on parody or satire and entail carnivalesque reversals; it may conceal, even camouflage, the true personality of an artist for various reasons; it may also challenge the notion of physical integrity, singularity and authenticity especially when produced in series. By changing his/her sexual, ethnic, social identity, the artist may convey a strong message and situate his/her practice within society. This conference is an invitation to consider the complexity of the self-portrait in costume particularly in the contemporary period. Indeed, both postmodern reflexivity and self-referentiality, and the extended possibilities offered by image manipulation have revived this genre, with the success of selfies or avatars for instance raising new questions.

Contemporary creation puts the relationships between animality/humanity, body/machine under scrutiny, and is inspired by ontological theories (E. Kosofsky Sedgwick, Donna Haraway, Mel Y. Chen). The otherization of the self or the incorporation of the other –and the other-self in works concerned with the motif of the doppleganger—are processes of self-investigation that are worth analysing.

Contact Info: Julie More, Centre de Recherche sur les Identités Nationales et l’Interculturalité (CRINI) -Université de Nantes, julie.morere@univ-nantes.fr

Special Issue of Fashion Practice
Jun
1
5:00 pm17:00

Special Issue of Fashion Practice

Fashion Localism

Localism is a growing movement of place, community and nature. This special issue seeks to explore localism in the context of fashion, investigating the dynamic interconnections between specific places, people, ecological contexts, economies and the provision and expression of fashion clothes.

In localism, place matters. Local ecosystems provide both resources and constraints to an area’s activity. People and communities evolve within unique natural and social assets of where they are based. Ecosystem health is preserved through the local adaptation of knowledge, products, cultures and practices. This special issue contends that in fashion, place also matters. It explores fashion localism as a cornerstone principle and practice of sustainability where place-based and community values describe a fashion system reconceptualised by scale, stewardship and sufficiency.

The special issue will examine fashion localism from multiple perspectives.  We welcome contributions that investigate (but are not limited to) the following topics:

  • Local or regional activity as part of self-reliant fashion communities;
  • The relationship between ecosystems, soil, watersheds (etc) and fashion production;
  • Explicit normative framework of localism in fashion;
  • Analytical paradigm of localism in the context of clothing and dress;
  • An exploration of the social nature of localism;
  • The role of consumption, consumers and non-market actors in localism in the fashion context;
  • The role of diversity, scale and resilience within fashion systems.
  • The role of legislation and marketing in leveraging a change from globalized to localized fashion systems.

Submission Instructions

Papers of between 6,000 and 8,000 words should be sent by the deadline: 1st June 2017 to the guest co-editors, earlier where possible. The guest editors invite would-be contributors to contact them to discuss potential submissions well in advance of the deadline and also welcome proposals about submissions in other formats.

Authors are advised to consult the Taylor and Francis website for author instructions and style guidelines at http://www.tandfonline.com/rffp

Editorial information

Guest Editor: Kate Fletcher, Centre for Sustainable Fashion, University of the Arts London(k.t.fletcher@fashion.arts.ac.uk)

Guest Editor: Ingun Grimstad Klepp, Consumption Research Norway (SIFO)(ingun.g.klepp@sifo.hioa.no)

Rediscovering Culture: Transforming Fashion
Jun
5
3:00 am03:00

Rediscovering Culture: Transforming Fashion

National Institute of Fashion Technology announces the ‘Call for Papers’ for the International Conference from 31st January -2nd February 2018 at New Delhi, India.

The association of fashion with rapid technological advancement and extensive consumption, spurred by rapidly changing trends and dominated by commercial motivations has contributed to its undertone of transience. The erosion of traditional institutions and cultures and the disruption of the harmony between environment and the human existence forebodes an unsustainable future. However, in recent times there is a perceptible shift in the focus of fashion from business considerations to a more responsible attitude towards sustainability concerns. Slow design, green production processes, waste generation and disposal systems, management of end to end solutions and Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives with mindfulness towards ecological fragility are being incorporated by the design community and the industry. 

Fashion, as a signifier of societal change, can stimulate contemporary articulations on the dialectics of tradition and modernity in the clothing, textile and craft sectors. The pedagogy of fashion and design education in synergizing materials and techniques plays a tripartite role in design, production and consumption.

The theme of the conference ‘Rediscovering Culture: Transforming Fashion’ aims to initiate conversation on fashion, culture, textiles, crafts and sustainability by providing an interdisciplinary platform to share perspectives and practice-led research experiences on the issues and concerns, challenges and possibilities of changing existing fashion practices. Trans-global cultural narratives may enable relevant issues to transcend the regional to take on global significance. Some pertinent questions that the Conference seeks to discuss are 

  • Can rediscovery of regional craft cultures hold the key to sustainability and empowerment?
  • Can the symbiosis of environment and human knowledge-skills engender new design definitions and experiences?
  • Is green technology the solution to sustainable apparel production systems?
  • How can the hand-made revitalize markets?
  • How can fashion education become catalyst for rediscovering culture?

Research papers / thematic posters may focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics under the subthemes:

I. Cultural Transformation by Design

  • Tradition and contemporaneity of fashion
  • Redefining culture through craft revival
  • Co-creation
  • Craft as luxury 

II. Tech-novation

  • Green manufacturing
  • Digital technologies
  • Compliance and sustainability standards

III. Business Models

  • Innovative business structures
  • Fair Trade Practices
  • Digital retail for rural producers

IV. Fashion Education

  • Pedagogy of craft-fashion linkages
  • Inculcating value for heritage
  • Experiential learning 

The subthemes and questions are only indicative of possible lines of reflection. In order to facilitate evaluation, authors are requested to indicate the subtheme in the abstract. 

TIMELINES FOR SUBMISSION

  • Announcement of call for abstracts- 3rd April 2017
  • Submission of abstract - 5th June 2017
  • Communication regarding acceptance of abstracts – 26th June 2017
  • Submission of full paper - 28th August 2017
  • Communication regarding acceptance of full papers-25th September 2017

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The Abstract should follow these guidelines:

  • Title
  • Subtheme(s) and 5 keywords below the title
  • Author name, affiliation and email address. In case of multiple authors, one author should be identified as the corresponding author.
  • Abstract should be 300 to 350 words in English. This word count does not include subtheme(s) and keywords. Abstract should not exceed the prescribed word limit.
  • No name or affiliation of the author in the text 
  • Font -Times New Roman, size- 12 pt. double spacing 
  • 1 inch margin all around 
  • Only Microsoft Word files will be accepted 

Author(s) are allowed to submit more than one abstract. Abstracts will be uploaded online, the link for which will be available shortly. For any other query please contact through nic2018@nift.ac.in

REVIEW PROCESS
All abstracts and conference papers will be double-blind peer reviewed by competent reviewers. Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to submit full papers of 3,000 to 4,000 words.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
All papers presented at the conference will be published. At the time of submission of full papers, authors are required to sign a copyright agreement with NIFT.

 

Image Credit: Tim Mitchell, "Clothing Recycled" (2005) via Europeana Fashion

 

New Research in Dress History Conference
Jul
1
11:59 pm23:59

New Research in Dress History Conference

The Association of Dress Historians

Friday, 13 April 2018 and Saturday, 14 April 2018
The Art Workers Guild, 6 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AT, England

The Association of Dress Historians (ADH) invites you to submit a paper proposal to present at our annual New Research in Dress History Conference. 

We welcome innovative, interdisciplinary, and critical research papers or those that add to or challenge established studies. In particular, we would like to hear from:

• Postgraduate students who are researching a dissertation or thesis
• Curators who wish to discuss recent or future exhibitions
• Independent researchers embarking upon new projects

The deadline for conference paper proposal submissions is 23:59GMT, Saturday, 1 July 2017. 

Potential conference speakers are not required to hold an ADH membership at the time of proposal submission; however, all ADH conference speakers must hold a current ADH membership at the time of the conference during which they present. ADH memberships are £10 per year per individual and are valid from 1 January to 31 December inclusive, regardless of when during the year the membership commences.

Please submit your proposal for a fifteen-minute conference paper presentation by completing the form on ADH website.

In Pursuit of Luxury: Luxury, Sustainability and Waste
Jul
21
Jul 22

In Pursuit of Luxury: Luxury, Sustainability and Waste

17th-18th November 2017, Ruth Prowse School of Art, Cape Town, South Africa

This event is a collaboration between The School of Creative Arts at the University of Hertfordshire and Brooklyn College of the City University of New York.

Deadline for abstracts: 21st July 2017

The debate surrounding luxury continues in so much as there are more questions than answers where definitions of luxury are concerned. In addition, there is much more debate surrounding social responsibility, the origin of materials and manufacture, the inclusion of technology, the retail environment and disposable products.

We continue to ask ourselves whether traditional definitions of luxury are relevant in today’s global marketplace and how the contemporary luxury market addresses change through addressing shifts in consumer habits. Mass production remains the focus of global luxury brands, however there has been a shift in customer loyalty, the introduction on ‘limited’ editions of products and the introduction of ‘salons’ to enhance the value added to the retail and shopping experience. Advances in technology continue to challenge the status-quo where innovation in manufacture, customisation and materials are concerned and an increase in value attributed to craftsmanship may be pushing both industry and academics to redefine contemporary concepts and interpretations of luxury.

Have we changed our perception of luxury and therefore re-defining what it represents? What do we understand by the term luxury and can it or should it be applied to all luxury branded goods? Does contemporary branding allow such goods to remain ‘luxurious’ even though they have been mass-produced? And is the circular economy redefining the parameters of the definition of luxury where we consider the notions of sustainability and the impact of waste in what is becoming a ‘polluted’ consumer Environment.

By discussing the history of luxury against the backdrop of contemporary issues, a familiar debate is extended into unfamiliar contexts. In this new and dynamic juxtaposition of seemingly unrelated market cultures significant inter-relationships are proposed and explored to expand the parameters of the debate around the concepts of luxury.

Fashion Film has become increasingly central to describing, promoting, defining and enhancing luxury brands. They are able to engage in story telling that static advertising is not able to do. In addition, fashion film is provocative in its approach, generates much debate and is in some instances contentious. With this in mind the In Pursuit of Luxury Conference 2017 invites submissions of Fashion Films focusing on luxury and luxury brands. The aim is to provide new perspectives on the ways in which notions of luxury are disseminated to an ever increasing global audience. We encourage and welcome debate around the subject.

This conference intends to expand the parameters of the debate around the concepts of luxury to provide a refreshing context to construe the familiar debates surrounding the subject.

Indicative themes for the conference are, but are not limited to luxury and:

  • History
  • Craft and the handmade
  • Branding, marketing and communication
  • Consumption and consumer attitudes
  • The retail environment
  • Fashion
  • Fashion film
  • Digital technology
  • The digital environment
  • Sourcing and production
  • Materials and sustainability
  • Re-purpose, re-use, re-frame
  • Wasted luxury
  • Eco-design

A special evening of screenings will take place during the conference.

Please see our website for details on how to submit: 

www.herts.ac.uk/in-pursuit-of-luxury/conferences/ipol-conference-2017

Deadline for abstracts: 21st July 2017

Conference date: 17th and 18th November 2017

Contact: Nick Thomas

Email: n.thomas9@herts.ac.uk

Fashion and Media
Aug
1
5:00 pm17:00

Fashion and Media

October 14, 2017, University of Drexel, Westphal College of Media Arts & Design

Fashion is signified and utilized through various forms of media. In Fashion And…symposium we will focus on how fashion is portrayed in all types of media. Presentations should examine the representations and expressions of fashion, apparel, garments, clothing, and textiles in various forms. Whether examining the latest technological innovations in fashion design, or how clothing is portrayed in paintings and sculpture, to the use of social media allowing an individual to show the latest clothing they purchased to friends, this symposium aims to push the envelopeof scholarship to gain new understandings about the visual expression of fashion, apparel, garments, clothing and textiles through all media types. From the historical to the contemporary – the technological to fine artistic expression, Fashion And Media aims to be international in scope and represent a wide variety of disciplines, with a particular emphasis on perspectives and approaches from the humanities, social sciences, and the arts interconnections between fashion and media.

The symposium has an inclusive definition of the term “fashion”. While fashion is often understood to center on apparel choices, fashion can be recognized as the current style or way of behaving in any field. Thus, proposals are welcome from divergent fields such as fine arts, digital media, television, film, merchandising, fashion design, business, architecture, anthropology, cultural studies, history, interior design, graphic design, psychology, sociology, and women’s studies among others to examine interconnections and intersections between fashion and media.

This symposium provides the opportunity for academics, researchers, graduate, and undergraduate students to exchange research findings, innovative teaching strategies, and creative designs addressing the interrelationships between fashion and media.

Participation

You are invited to participate in this symposium by submitting a written abstract detailing scholarship and/or research study, an abstract of innovative teaching strategy, a design, or a proposal for a panel of speakers addressing some aspect of fashion and media (all panel members will have to register). All accepted abstract submissions will be published in the conference proceedings.

Symposium formats include poster sessions (wall mountable only), design work, concurrent design, scholarship/research and teaching presentations (each speaker will have 15 – 20 minutes), and panel sessions that are submitted will need to have a minimum of 3 participants.

 Topics may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Fashion in Fine Arts
  • Fashion in Print Media & Advertising
  • Fashion in Magazines & Marketing
  • Magalogues & Catalogues
  • Fashion on Television
  • The Internet & Fashion
  • Fashion in Public Relations & Events
  • The Runway As a Form of Fashion Media
  • Historical Twists in Fashion Because of Media Influences
  • Artwork & Design Representing Fashion Through New Forms of Media
  • The Impact of Social Media on Style and Fashion
  • Changes in the Psychology and Sociology of Fashion Because of Media
  • How media helps us to communicate fashion identities
  • Media and its relations to gender and fashion
  • Media and its relations to fashion and sex
  • Fashion, Media & The Body
  • Fashion, Media, Work & Careers
  • Fashion, Media & Popular and American Culture
  • Other Proposals Related to Fashion & Media

Submission Guidelines

Abstract Abstracts should present research/scholarship/teaching/design that has not been published or presented at other professional conferences. Use Times New Roman, font size 12, for all text including titles and 1 inch margins. Prepare three electronic files, all in Microsoft Word format. Undergraduate submissions must have a faculty sponsor. It is the responsibility of the faculty sponsor to screen the entries for quality, completeness, and accuracy and to be actively involved in the submission process. All research/teaching/design submissions presented at the symposium will be included in the Proceedings. An author whose work is accepted, an author from a team of researchers, or the undergraduate faculty sponsor must attend the symposium and present the work as well as register for the symposium.

File 1 contains a cover page with title of paper and name and contact information (address, phone number, email) for all authors. Corresponding author is designated. All symposium information will be sent to corresponding author only.

File 2 contains an abstract in English for review (2 pages maximum, single spaced, in a Word.doc format; one inch margins, font size 12, Times New Roman). Include the title (single spaced, centered, maximum 30 words) but no identifying information about author(s) or professional affiliation(s). Tables and other graphics should be incorporated within the body of the abstract in the appropriate place(s). All content (references, tables, figures) must fit within the 2 page limit.

File 3 contains the information in file 2 with the addition of authors, institutional affiliation, and country information left justified. File 3 will be used for the symposium proceedings. This will go directly into the proceedings once the submission has been accepted for presentation. There will be no opportunity to make changes once submitted to the symposium.

EXAMPLE OF CORRECT FORMAT:
This Is the Title of the Paper
Joseph H. Hancock, II, Some University, USA (Country)
(or if multiple authors)
This Is the Title of the Paper
Joseph H. Hancock, II and Anne Peirson-Smith, Some University, USA

or

Joseph H. Hancock, II, Some University, USA
Anne Peirson-Smith, A Different University, USA
[List affiliation after each author’s name if the authors are from different universities; use the affiliation once after the last author’s name if all authors are from the same university.]

Submit all 3 files to Joseph H. Hancock, II at jhh33@drexel.edu

In the subject line of your submission use the following wording to indicate whether you are submitting a teaching, research, design, or panel abstract

  • Fashion & Media: Teaching
  • Fashion & Media: Scholarship/Research
  • Fashion & Media: Design
  • Fashion & Media: Panel

Attach the three files to your email as described in the guidelines above.

Complete a separate e-mail submission for each abstract/design/panel you want to submit. Multiple submissions are welcomed. Authors will be notified that their submission was received. If you fail to receive notification within 72 hours, please contact Joseph H. Hancock, II at joseph.hancockii@gmail.com.

Abstract Submission Deadline (Received by): Proposals are accepted on a rolling basis up until August 1, 2017. All submission will be notified one month after they have submitted their proposal.